Showing posts tagged africa

mikasavela:

Residence hall at the University College in Ibadan, Nigeria.

Modernizing Africa was the theme of Life Magazine, May 1953. The story highlighted the words: European faculty, British architects and educated elite.

I imagine this is the University of Ibadan that my dad attended… I wonder what it looks like now.

(Reblogged from numbla)

ilorejo:

Dakar, Senegal

(Reblogged from beautiful-afrique)
At least 313 million Africans–that’s one in three Africans–can be defined as middle class, according to the African Development Bank. If you earn between $2 and $20 a day , working in “salaried jobs or own small businesses,” you’re middle class. But only 123 million of these–those who are spending between $4 and $20 a day–can be considered economically stable, according to the ADB. And, “Tunisia, Gabon and Botswana have the largest middle classes, while Liberia, Mozambique and Rwanda have the smallest.” The BBC combined all this information with a slideshow of the photographer Philippe Sibelly’s project on middle class Africans, The Other Africa. The photo above is of Antoine, “a tennis instructor in Gabon’s capital, Libreville.” (via ‘Africa’s burgeoning middle class’ | AFRICA IS A COUNTRY)

At least 313 million Africans–that’s one in three Africans–can be defined as middle class, according to the African Development Bank. If you earn between $2 and $20 a day , working in “salaried jobs or own small businesses,” you’re middle class. But only 123 million of these–those who are spending between $4 and $20 a day–can be considered economically stable, according to the ADB. And, “Tunisia, Gabon and Botswana have the largest middle classes, while Liberia, Mozambique and Rwanda have the smallest.” The BBC combined all this information with a slideshow of the photographer Philippe Sibelly’s project on middle class Africans, The Other Africa. The photo above is of Antoine, “a tennis instructor in Gabon’s capital, Libreville.” (via ‘Africa’s burgeoning middle class’ | AFRICA IS A COUNTRY)

(Reblogged from fyahblaze)

Global hunger index

Two-thirds of the countries surveyed have lower poverty levels than in 1990. Nigeria saw improvements between 25 and 50%, while our neighbours in Ghana had an impressive growth level greater than 50% (the only green zone in West Africa)

I wonder what the isolated green dots scattered across red/pink zones in Africa and Asia represent. good neighbourhoods? presidential plazas?